Your Health Insurance Company May Ask for Your Social Security Number

Your Health Insurance Company May Ask for Your Social Security Number

Health coverage providers will file an information return, Form 1095-BHealth Coverage, with the IRS and will furnish statements to you in 2016, to report coverage information from calendar year 2015.

 

The law requires coverage providers to list social security numbers on this form. If you don’t provide your SSN and the SSNs of all covered individuals to the sponsor of the coverage, the IRS may not be able to match the Form 1095-B with the individuals to determine that they have complied with the individual shared responsibility provision.

Your health insurance company may send a letter that discusses these new rules and requests social security numbers for all family members covered under your policy. The IRS has not designated a specific form for your health insurance company to request this information. The Form 1095-B will provide information for your income tax return that shows you, your spouse, and individuals you claim as dependents had qualifying health coverage for some or all months during the year. You do not have to attach Form 1095-B to your tax return. Keep it with your other important tax documents.

Anyone on your return who does not have minimum essential coverage, and who does not qualify for an exemption, may be liable for the individual shared responsibility payment.

The information received by the IRS will be used to verify information on your individual income tax return. If you refuse to provide this information to your health insurance company, the IRS cannot verify the information you provide on your tax return and you may receive an inquiry from the IRS. You also may receive a notice from the IRS indicating that you are liable for a shared responsibility payment.

 

Back-to-School Reminder for Parents and Students: Check Out College Tax Credits for 2015 and Forward

Back-to-School Reminder for Parents and Students: Check Out College Tax Credits for 2015 and Forward

In general, the American Opportunity Tax Credit or Lifetime Learning Credit is available to taxpayers who pay qualifying expenses for an eligible student. Eligible students include the taxpayer, spouse and dependents. The American Opportunity Tax Credit provides a credit for each eligible student, while the Lifetime Learning Credit provides a maximum credit per tax return.

Though a taxpayer often qualifies for both of these credits, he or she can only claim one of them for a particular student in a particular year. To claim these credits on their tax return, the taxpayer must file Form 1040 or 1040A and complete Form 8863, Education Credits.

The credits apply to eligible students enrolled in an eligible college, university or vocational school, including both nonprofit and for-profit institutions. The credits are subject to income limits that could reduce the amount claimed on their tax return.

To help determine eligibility for these benefits, taxpayers should visit the Education Credits web page or use the IRS’s Interactive Tax Assistant tool. Both are available on IRS.gov.

Normally, a student will receive a Form 1098-T from their institution by Jan. 31 of the following year. (For 2015, the due date is Feb. 1, 2016, because otherwise it would fall on a Sunday.) This form will show information about tuition paid or billed along with other information. However, amounts shown on this form may differ from amounts taxpayers are eligible to claim for these tax credits.

Taxpayers should see the instructions to Form 8863 and Publication 970 for details on properly figuring allowable tax benefits.

Many of those eligible for the American Opportunity Tax Credit qualify for the maximum annual credit of $2,500 per student. Students can claim this credit for qualified education expenses paid during the entire tax year for a certain number of years:

  • The credit is only available for four tax years per eligible student
  • The credit is available only if the student has not completed the first four years of post-secondary education before 2015

Here are some more key features of the credit:

  • Qualified education expenses are amounts paid for tuition, fees and other related expenses for an eligible student. Other expenses, such as room and board, are not qualified expenses
  • The credit equals 100 percent of the first $2,000 spent and 25 percent of the next $2,000. That means the full $2,500 credit may be available to a taxpayer who pays $4,000 or more in qualified expenses for an eligible student
  • Forty percent of the American Opportunity Tax Credit is refundable. This means that even people who owe no tax can get an annual payment of up to $1,000 for each eligible student
  • The full credit can only be claimed by taxpayers whose modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) is $80,000 or less. For married couples filing a joint return, the limit is $160,000. The credit is phased out for taxpayers with incomes above these levels. No credit can be claimed by joint filers whose MAGI is $180,000 or more and singles, heads of household and some widows and widowers whose MAGI is $90,000 or more

The Lifetime Learning Credit of up to $2,000 per tax return is available for both graduate and undergraduate students. Unlike the American Opportunity Tax Credit, the limit on the Lifetime Learning Credit applies to each tax return, rather than to each student. Also, the Lifetime Learning Credit does not provide a benefit to people who owe no tax.

Though the half-time student requirement does not apply to the lifetime learning credit, the course of study must be either part of a post-secondary degree program or taken by the student to maintain or improve job skills. Other features of the credit include:

  • Tuition and fees required for enrollment or attendance qualify, as do other fees required for the course. Additional expenses do not
  • The credit equals 20 percent of the amount spent on eligible expenses across all students on the return. That means the full $2,000 credit is only available to a taxpayer who pays $10,000 or more in qualifying tuition and fees and has sufficient tax liability
  • Income limits are lower than under the American Opportunity Tax Credit. For 2015, the full credit can be claimed by taxpayers whose MAGI is $55,000 or less. For married couples filing a joint return, the limit is $110,000. The credit is phased out for taxpayers with incomes above these levels. No credit can be claimed by joint filers whose MAGI is $130,000 or more and singles, heads of household and some widows and widowers whose MAGI is $65,000 or more

Eligible parents and students can get the benefit of these credits during the year by having less tax taken out of their paychecks. They can do this by filling out a new Form W-4, claiming additional withholding allowances, and giving it to their employer.

There are a variety of other education-related tax benefits that can help many taxpayers. They include:

  • Scholarship and fellowship grants — generally tax-free if used to pay for tuition, required enrollment fees, books and other course materials, but taxable if used for room, board, research, travel or other expenses
  • Student loan interest deduction of up to $2,500 per year
  • Savings bonds used to pay for college — though income limits apply, interest is usually tax-free if bonds were purchased after 1989 by a taxpayer who, at time of purchase, was at least 24 years old
  • Qualified tuition programs, also called 529 plans, used by many families to prepay or save for a child’s college education

Taxpayers with qualifying children who are students up to age 24 may be able to claim a dependent exemption and the Earned Income Tax Credit.

The general comparison table in Publication 970 can be a useful guide to taxpayers in determining eligibility for these benefits. Details can also be found in the Tax Benefits for Education Information Center on IRS.gov.

Eight Things to Know about the Taxpayer Advocate Service

Eight Things to Know about the Taxpayer Advocate Service

  1. TAS is Your Voice at IRS.The Taxpayer Advocate Service, or TAS, is your voice at the IRS. They are an independent organization within the IRS.

 

  1. TAS Helps Resolve Problems. TAS helps individuals, businesses and exempt organizations who are not able to resolve their tax problems with the IRS. Services are always free. TAS can help if:
  • Your problem is causing financial difficulty for you, your family, or your business.
  • You, your business or your organization is facing an immediate threat of adverse action.
  • You have tried repeatedly to contact the IRS but no one has responded. We will also help if the IRS has not responded by the date promised.

 

  1. Taxpayer Bill of Rights.The IRS has adopted a Taxpayer Bill of Rights that includes 10 basic rights that every taxpayer has when interacting with the IRS:
  • The right to be informed
  • The right to quality service
  • The right to pay no more than the correct amount of tax
  • The right to challenge the IRS’s position and be heard
  • The right to appeal an IRS decision in an independent forum
  • The right to finality
  • The right to privacy
  • The right to confidentiality
  • The right to retain representation
  • The right to a fair and just tax system

 

  1. TAS Protects Your Rights. TAS protects taxpayers’ rights by ensuring that the IRS treats all taxpayers fairly and that you know and understand your rights. Our taxpayer rights web pagecan help you understand what these rights mean to you and how they apply.

 

  1. TAS on the Web Toolkit Can Help. The TAS Tax Toolkit at TaxpayerAdvocate.irs.govexplains common tax issues. It also offers self-help videos and documents. You can use the site’s information to solve your tax problem or help you understand it when you work with the IRS and your tax preparer.

 

  1. Report a Problem that Affects Many Taxpayers.TAS also handles large-scale or “big picture” problems that affect many taxpayers. You can report these issues at www.irs.gov/sams.
  2. TAS in Every State. We have offices in every state, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Your local advocate’s number is in your local directory and at taxpayeradvocate.irs.gov. You can also call us at 877-777-4778.

 

  1. TAS on Social Media. Keep up with us via social media:
Tips on Travel While Giving Your Services to Charity

Tips on Travel While Giving Your Services to Charity

Some travel expenses may help lower your taxes when you file your tax return next year. Here are several tax tips that you should know if you travel while giving your services to charity.

  • Qualified Charities. In order to deduct your costs, your volunteer work must be for a qualified charity. Most groups must apply to the IRS to become qualified. Churches and governments are qualified, and do not need to apply to the IRS. Ask the group about its IRS status before you donate. You can also use the Select Check toolon IRS.gov to check the group’s status.

 

  • Out-of-Pocket Expenses.You may be able to deduct some costs you pay to give your services. This can include the cost of travel. The costs must be necessary while you are away from home giving your services for a qualified charity. All costs must be:

 

o Unreimbursed,

o Directly connected with the services,

o Expenses you had only because of the services you gave, and

o Not personal, living or family expenses.

  • Genuine and Substantial Duty. Your charity work has to be real and substantial throughout the trip. You can’t deduct expenses if you only have nominal duties or do not have any duties for significant parts of the trip.

 

  • Value of Time or Service. You can’t deduct the value of your services that you give to charity. This includes income lost while you work as an unpaid volunteer for a qualified charity.

 

  • Deductible travel.The types of expenses that you may be able to deduct include:

 

o Air, rail and bus transportation,

o Car expenses,

o Lodging costs,

o The cost of meals, and

o Taxi or other transportation costs between the airport or station and your hotel.

  • Non-deductible Travel.Some types of travel do not qualify for a tax deduction. For example, you can’t deduct your costs if a significant part of the trip involves recreation or a vacation.